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  • 08 Mar 2019 8:00 AM | Anonymous

    I wanted to take today and talk about International Women’s day, and take a look at the status of women in the world, and in our industry.

    International Women’s Day (IWD) is celebrated annually on March 8. The day has occurred for well over a century, with the first IWD gathering in 1911. Gloria Steinem, world-renowned feminist, journalist, and activist once explained: “The story of women’s struggle for equality belongs to no single feminist nor to any one organization but to the collective efforts of all who care about human rights.” (Read More)

    This is a day to think about our sisters across the world, and down the street. Check in with a group that is doing good for women, like the Girl Scouts or WIFVNE. Reach out to become a mentor. Talk to a male counterpart about what they think and get the conversation between the sexes going. I have long preached this (getting men involved) within the context of women in film. Men’s involvement is paramount.

    From the IWD website: Two thirds of those surveyed believe that women won’t achieve equality in their country unless men take actions to support women’s rights too. However, opinion is split on whether too much is being expected of men to help the fight for equality. 43% agree that men are being expected to do too much compared with 46% who disagree. Agreement is higher among men than women (50% vs 36%).”  (Read More)

    What about the film industry? Here is a headline that should give you hope:

    Number of Films with Women and People of Color in Leading Roles Hits Record High (According to a new study from USC’s Annenberg Inclusion Initiative)

    2018-2019: Representation for women and people of color in top grossing films is higher than ever. The study examines leading and co-leading roles in the top 100 grossing movies of 2018 (as well as those from the preceding 11 years for comparison)

    As opposed to last year’s assessment:

    2017-2018: There has been no significant statistical improvement in the representation of women, people of color, LGBT characters, or characters with disability in film over the last decade. (Read the Report)

    Is progress being made? How do we really measure it? When will we feel the effect of Hollywood in our own communities. For those who are data nerds (like myself) our sisters in NY have a great page of reports and resources on the Status of Women in the Industry. 

    Why is this important? Hollywood and the film industry are the mirror that we hold up to ourselves in society. If we see our lives reflected in film, television and social media it breeds a sense of self. How the world should be. For too long it’s been very white and very male. This IWD, I hope you will challenge yourself to reach outside your comfort zone and shine a light on your sisters this day and for the rest of the year. Need ideas? Check out the resources on the IWD site here: Lean In

  • 08 Mar 2019 8:00 AM | Anonymous

    Cie Peterson of Connecticut – Content Creator/Director – Member of WIFVNE

    What’s the best part about your work?

    Collaboration. Negotiating myriad points-of-view can be challenging, but it is also invigorating, rewarding, and divine.

    What challenges have you’ve faced in this industry as a woman?

    My biggest challenge remains just working. Creating/finding/securing opportunities to direct in the Hartford area can feel like swimming against the tide, which, honestly, gets exhausting. Then the work actually comes, and it’s exhilarating.

    In the age of #MeToo & #TimesUp, what do you hope to see happening in the future for women in our industry?

    I think the hope we all have is for opportunity to avail itself to everyone without regard for gender, sexual preference, color, ethnicity, or age!

    What’s one way you would suggest people “Change the Lens”?

    Every time someone unexpected does something of quality and value, audiences and greenlighters alike will seek out more of those kinds of people. Changing perceptions is nearly always an exercise in slow and steady winning the race through good work, good effort, and good results.

    What advice would you give to a new female filmmaker?

    Be authentic, tenacious, professional, smart and utterly honest with yourself and others. And ALWAYS treat other people as you would like them to treat you.

    What goals do you have for this year?

    To work more and to use my directing skills to shine a much more visible and much more positive light on my adopted hometown of Hartford.

    Upcoming Events or Announcements? What are you working on?

    HUGE event/announcement is the March 10 screening of my production company’s second digital series A Coupla Pros. Can’t make it? – and/or want to support our efforts? – pre-order the entire first season for only $20, and begin binge watching it on March 11. Purchase tickets and/or the season at cloudsandawaffle.com/premiere

    How can your fans find you!?

    @cloudsandawaffle on IG and FB, cloudsandawaffle.com, and Clouds and a Waffle on YouTube

  • 07 Mar 2019 8:00 AM | Anonymous

    Elaine Grey of Massachusetts. SAG/AFTRA Actor/Director/Writer/Producer Women in Film Member

    What’s the best part about your work? The best part, of my work, is the satisfaction I get from completing a project, and knowing that I gave it my all.  I do love working with industry people forging meaningful relationships and sharing my knowledge to help them advance their careers.

    What challenges have you’ve faced in this industry as a woman? (Or otherwise) My work, as a woman over fifty, in the Entertainment Industry, is full of exciting challenges and opportunities that are exciting. However, it requires a constant juggling act, of balancing between running a household and completing all of the tasks necessary to keep my work fresh and competitive. Whether it is acting, directing, writing, producing, forging new collaborations, or mentoring, I do enjoy each challenge, and take them, as they comes.   

    In the age of #MeToo & #TimesUp, what do you hope to see happening in the future for women in our industry? I hope to see respectful and safer workplaces for women, and more more equality in terms of jobs and pay. What’s one way you would suggest people “Change the Lens”? I definitely would like to see more female directors, in the industry, and more intergenerational roles for women over fifty.

    What advice would you give to a new female filmmaker? If you are a writer, begin to tell your story. Be passionate about your work. Write stories that are compassionate and inspirational and that reach across generations. If you are a director, share your passion and vision of the writer’s work with your Director of Photography and the entire cast and crew. Get everyone in the project excited and on board. Story and vision boards will help you to achieve that goal. Incorporate men in your project so that you are more inclusive. Contact the SAG/AFTRA New England office, and explore the contract options, so you can include union actors in your project.

    What goals do you have for this year? This year,  I will continue to be a guest writer for “Imagine Magazine.” It is also my plan to write a short film, or Webisode, and to do some more directing because I enjoyed the experience directing the shot films COFFEE TALK and LATE.
    I have been given several scripts to read and hope to collaborate on some of them. One in particular was written by a talented young woman, who wrote me in, as the lead-principal character. I am very excited about this opportunity.  I hope to forge and facilitate more collaborations, during 2019, as I did with Dennis Serpone and Joel Finegold on “SWEENEY KILLING SWEENEY.”

    What women in the region (New England) inspire you? Women in the industry, who inspire me, are Carol Patton, Publisher of “Imagine Magazine,” Dorothy Aufiero, Producer of BLACK MASS  & THE FINEST HOURS, and Alecia Jean Orsini Lebeda, President of Women in Film and Video, N.E.

    Upcoming Events or Announcements? What are you working on? The upcoming film season will be a busy one, and I will be available for auditions for productions that will arrive in spring I hope to work again on female director Frankie Shaw’s SMILF, should it return for Season 3, and on the Steven King television series, CASTLE ROCK. I will continue to participate in Acting workshops, with Charlotte Dore, Doug Weeks and others at “Actors Unite,” and, as a member of Peter Kelley’s Boston-Actors-Core-Group and Weekend Acting Workshops.

  • 06 Mar 2019 8:00 AM | Anonymous

    Brittanny Taylor of Rhode Island – Branding and lifestyle photographer and productivity coach.

    What’s the best part about your work? Helping female small business owners show themselves off to the world. I see how amazing they are and I am grateful that I can use my skills as a photographer to show them how amazing they are too.

    What challenges have you’ve faced in this industry as a woman? As a black woman in this industry, I notice that my rates get questioned more than others. I’ve been expected to work for little to nothing, when I know how much was paid to my white female counterparts.

    What’s one way you would suggest people “Change the Lens”? Supporting films and projects created by women and trans people of color and most importantly, hire them!

    What goals do you have for this year? I want to continue to grow my photography business. This is my tenth year of being a photographer and I am still learning and evolving and I am excited to see how my business grows this year.

    What women in the region (New England) inspire you? My co-founders of The Branding Edit, Patsy Culp and Olivia Rodrigues. Also, my friend Sierra Barter, who founded The Lady Project.

    Upcoming Events or Announcements? What are you working on? I recently launched BT’s Bootcamp, my productivity coaching service for people who are a bit overwhelmed with work who need a helping hand planning their day or launching their product.

    Where can your fans find you? My website is brittannytaylor.com. You can find me at @brittanny on Instagram and Twitter and on Facebook at facebook.com/brittannytaylor

  • 05 Mar 2019 8:00 AM | Anonymous

    Armandina Cueva of Massachusetts – Media Producer/Consultant. Member of Women in Film.

    What’s the best part about your work? Working with a talented & supportive team. This collaborative environment allows us to focus our energy on creating amazing projects and it brings the best out of me.

    What challenges have you’ve faced in this industry as a woman? For many years I found myself having to exert energy towards being heard, defending my position and fighting to earn respect in what felt like/was a men’s club.

    In the age of #MeToo & #TimesUp, what do you hope to see happening in the future for women in our industry? I hope women receive more senior-level positions in order to balance the industry and with that help provide a safer work environment for all.

    What’s one way you would suggest people “Change the Lens”? We are basically half the population and everyone was birth by a woman so is not an unfamiliar perspective, is closer to home that you might think.

    What advice would you give to a new female filmmaker? Don’t apologize, be bold and believe you belong.

    What goals do you have for this year? Increase my contribution to the media landscape in New England.

    What women in the region (New England) inspire you? Uff, trick question, there is always inspiration in every woman, you will find a story behind their silence, their clothes, their words, their jobs, almost all with a thread of qualities, like strength, empathy, resilience, you just have to pay attention.

    Upcoming Events or Announcements? What are you working on? Producing some cool trailers for Netflix, stay tuned! I am also on the board of this amazing Org MediaGirls, we have a fundraising/event: Get Strong Inside & Out – April 28 at the Brookline Teen Center, proceeds go towards bringing MEDIAGIRLS to more girls in underserved communities in Boston, for more info go to MEDIAGIRLS.org

    How can your fans find you!? https://www.linkedin.com/in/armandinacueva/

    https://www.linkedin.com/in/armandinacueva/

  • 04 Mar 2019 8:00 AM | Anonymous

    Trish Clark of Connecticut. City Producer for the New Haven 48 Hour Film Project & CEO Nutmeg Institute

    What challenges have you’ve faced in this industry as a woman? I think as a women in the industry I have had to work harder, longer, and with more determination to get ahead.  The good thing is that in this industry hard work gets noticed and gets you the next job or connection!

    In the age of #MeToo & #TimesUp, what do you hope to see happening in the future for women in our industry? I hope to see women support each other and reach out to each other first for the next job/project.  Train each other to do as much as we can to create more projects together. Believe in each other!

    What’s one way you would suggest people “Change the Lens”? I love the idea of inclusion riders – but as I said before train women in all aspects so that they are part of the pool, to begin with when looking for crew.  Don’t shut someone out, train them to do the jobs better. Any man or woman can fill any role on set.

    What advice would you give to a new female filmmaker? Keep going, keep creating, get your voice out there.  Find your people that keep pushing you forward and create with them.  Don’t give in and pander to what doesn’t speak to you or your vision. Make your vision the new vision that others want to be part of going forward.

    What goals do you have for this year? To make the New Haven 48 & Nutmeg Institute more widespread and more of a haven for creatives.

    What women in the region (New England) inspire you? Alicia Ghio from rmedia!  Alicia is a producer extraordinaire!  She runs all aspects of production at rmedia as well as serves on several Boards in the Danbury area.  She uses her production skills to highlight the town she loves. And she is a pleasure to collaborate and work with at every turn! Another woman is Caissie St. Onge of CT, who is now out in LA making a little show with Busy Phillips.  And it’s all about women working!

    Upcoming Events or Announcements? What are you working on? The New Haven 48HFP will be filming July 26th – 28th this year.  Screening on July 31 & August 1st. Awards night later in August.  
    Nutmeg Institute is teaching after school PSA production classes this entire school session as well as working with the Boys & Girls Club.  Some of those will screen at EdAdvance Skills 21 Awards night later this year. Nutmeg is also producing a 2nd annual short film competition in October with Two Roads Brewery.  And a new short film competition will be happening in Danbury in the fall as well.

    How can your fans find you!? https://www.48hourfilm.com/newhaven/ https://www.nutmeginstitute.com/ We’re on FB, IG, & twitter too!

  • 03 Mar 2019 8:00 AM | Anonymous

    Orly Yadin of Vermont. Executive Director of the Vermont International Film Festival

    What’s the best part about your work? Introducing the world to Vermont through film and getting the community together to attend screenings and exchange ideas. What challenges do you face? My challenges, like every head of a cultural non-profit organization is to ensure that film is appreciated as a vital and important part of a healthy and educated society, especially independent films from around the world. In the age of #MeToo & #TimesUp, what do you hope to see happening in the future for women in our industry? I hope the future for women in our industry and any industry will be to no longer need the label of “woman” attached to whatever she does.

    What’s one way you would suggest people “Change the Lens”? In my job as curator of film festivals and ongoing screenings, we try to change the lens by making sure that women filmmakers are fairly represented. The more we show good films by women, the more this will become normative. In the end, the audience will no longer think of those films as “made by women” but just relate to them as excellent films. What advice would you give to a new female filmmaker? Learn your trade. What goals do you have for this year? To increase activities, screenings and partnerships with other film organizations in New England What women in the region (New England) inspire you? Most women inspire me.

    Upcoming Events or Announcements? What are you working on? Our forthcoming 3-day film fest on the history of the movie musical. How could Ginger Rogers dance so seamlessly and lightly with those high heels and feather dress?

    FIND ORLY: @vermontfilm  https://vtiff.org

  • 02 Mar 2019 8:00 AM | Anonymous

    Carol Conley of Rhode Island – Assistant to the Executive Director of the RI Film & TV Office AND an award-winning filmmaker for my short, PENITENCE. Member of WIFVNE

    What’s the best part about your work? Being able to help other filmmakers realize their dreams in RI

    In the age of #MeToo & #TimesUp, what do you hope to see happening in the future for women in our industry? That everyone could have the pleasure of working for someone like my boss, Steven Feinberg, who treats EVERYONE with kindness and respect

    What’s one way you would suggest people “Change the Lens”? Definitely supporting women-made films

    What advice would you give to a new female filmmaker? Believe in your voice

    What goals do you have for this year? I have two short films that I hope to see get made this year

    What women in the region (New England) inspire you? Carol Patton

    Upcoming Events or Announcements? What are you working on? My short FLYING WITH BETTY BIRD has been picked by for production by Superficial Studios in the northwest and is scheduled to be shot in March. Iconic actress Marlyn Mason has agreed to star in my short film WELCOME.

    FIND CAROL: https://www.facebook.com/CarolC1006


  • 01 Mar 2019 8:00 AM | Anonymous

    This Member Spotlight interview was conducted by Dina Klein. Dina is our intern at WIFVNE and is a senior studying Visual Media Art at Emerson College. She is originally from Chicago and has had a passion for Film and Television since a young age. She is also an aspiring writer and screenwriter.

    Even though cinematographer Amanda McGrady came up as a digital shooter, she loves shooting on film when possible. She is inspired by practical FX and good old-fashioned movie magic. Over the years Amanda has shot a variety of projects including feature and short films that have screened at festivals around the world.

    How did you get started? 
    I started shooting horror films in high school. After that I was hooked and went to film school at Emerson College where I learned everything I could about making movies. I loved all of the departments, but in the end, I felt most inspired by shooting. I worked at Rule Boston Camera to learn more about cameras and that sort of propelled me into this obsession with cinematography that has become a career.  

    Who is someone you really want to work with? 
    Kathryn Bigelow 

    What do you love about the work that you do?  
    I love the creative process and collaboration of artists. I love telling a story and making the audience feel. Film is so powerful the way it can translate an experience from the characters to the viewer. A lot of that is a great story and great acting. The right lighting and camera movement can bring it to life.

    What can you tell us about your newest project, The Luring?
    The Luring is a psychological thriller set in Vermont. The feature film recently premiered at Panic Fest and got a great response from the audience. There is a lot more news coming soon so be sure to follow The Luring on Facebook and Instagram to find out where you can see the movie. 

    What has your experience as a woman in the industry been like?  
    This is a big question and I always find it hard to answer. I can only tell you about my experience and for me shooting films has always come naturally, shooting horror films is my favorite thing to do in the whole world. So there has never been a question of whether I belong or anything like that, because I’ve been determined to do it despite any barriers. I have been very fortunate to have been embraced by the people around me. I have to thank the men who are like brothers to me and taught me everything I know. Of course, there are times I don’t get a job because they want a guy, but there are also times I do get a job because they want a woman. In the end, I hope that people hire me because they like my work and like working with me regardless of my gender. 

    What has your experience working on The Luring?
    My experience on The Luring was very positive. We spent a lot of time working in preiproduction and it was well worth it. Months before principal photography we shot a fundraising piece and that was a great opportunity for the director, Christopher Wells, and I to get to know each other. We shot in Vermont. The town was gorgeous and everyone was very supportive. It was also challenging because we had to bring in everything necessary, even wi-fi. We spent two weeks right before the shoot going to locations, shot listing, walking through the action, and working with the Assistant Director to get everything prepared. Once we started shooting things fell into place.

    Do you have a mentor?  Are you a mentor?
    I’ve had some wonderful mentors over the years, primarily the folks I met at Rule Boston Camera. I am a mentor as well. Usually someone starts as an assistant and I teach them everything I can.

    Were you told or did you learn a piece of wisdom or advice you now tell others in the beginning of their career? 
    So many things! One thing I heard early on is that you have to make a living from this. You have to push yourself as a Director of Photography, you can’t do it on the weekends. 

    What are some things you think would help if more women were in the industry?
    I think we can be more supportive of each other and hopefully we can see that on screen as well. I would like to see more stories with women supporting each other and building each other up, not fighting or competing. 

    Where would you like to go in your work?  
    I hope to make films that audiences love watching. Creating worlds really excites me that’s why I’m drawn to horror and fantasy, but I’m open to different genres. 

    Why are you a member of WIFVNE?
    I think WIFVNE is awesome because we are in a small market here and that means we have a great opportunity to work together and make change. WIFVNE can help us network and support each other. 

    Photo credits
    1.  Amanda McGrady, Cinematographer 
    2. Talking about the next shot with The Luring director Christopher Wells 
    3.  Setting up a Night Exterior for The Luring:1st AD Michael Toscano, 1st AC Samuel Lusted, DP Amanda McGrady, PD Keenan McCarthy
    4. Location scout for The Luring just a few weeks before shooting
    5. Screen shot from The Luring featuring “Garrett” Rick Irwin and “Claire” Michaela Sprague
    6. Steadicam Operator Lisa Sene frames up a shot
    7. Screen shot from The Luring featuring “Jennifer” played by Molly Fahey

    With Amanda, we are kicking off featuring a Woman a Day on our site for Women’s History Month, but focusing on the present & our future!
  • 28 Feb 2019 8:00 AM | Anonymous

    This Member Spotlight interview was conducted by Dina Klein. Dina is our intern at WIFVNE and is a senior studying Visual Media Art at Emerson College. She is originally from Chicago and has had a passion for Film and Television since a young age. She is also an aspiring writer and screenwriter.


    Worcester, Massachusetts native Caitlin McCarthy (www.caitlinmccarthy.com) received her Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing from Emerson College.  An award-winning screenwriter at international film festivals and labs, Caitlin has written feature screenplays including WONDER DRUG and RESISTANCE. Caitlin is writing/creating the TV series “Free Skate,” named “One To Watch” on WeForShe’s WriteHer List; and partnering on writing/creating the TV series “Pass/Fail” with Jim Forbes (a multiple Emmy, ALMA, AP and Golden Mic award-winning writer, producer, correspondent, and narrator).  In addition to screenwriting, Caitlin serves as an English teacher at an urban public high school. Prior to education, she worked in public relations, where she fostered relationships with the press and crafted messages for companies that were delivered worldwide. 

    Caitlin is represented by Barry Krost of Barry Krost Management (BKM).

    How did you get started?  
    As an MFA student at Emerson College, I envisioned myself becoming a novelist. But a serendipitous meeting with Diane Ayoche, a teacher at Brockton High School, changed the course of my life. We met when I was transitioning out of a career in public relations and participating in a teacher training program. While chatting between classes, I mentioned that I had just finished writing a novel. Diane said, “Oh! I should introduce you to my cousin.” Her cousin turned out to be Oscar-nominated director Matia Karrell!  Matia read my unpublished novel and asked if I could turn it into a screenplay. I said yes, even though I had never written one before. I bought Final Draft software and The Screenwriter’s Bible by David Trottier, and then wrote several drafts under Matia’s tutelage. So, thanks to the interest and generosity of two women, I’m now a screenwriter.

    Who is one person in the industry you would want to work with?
    Ava DuVernay. Is there anything she can’t do? She’s a film director, producer, screenwriter, film marketer, and film distributor. She also champions other artists and speaks tirelessly on the need for inclusion in the entertainment industry.  Everyone knows who you mean when you say “Ava.” She is a rock star and role model. I’d love to work with and learn from her.

    What is your favorite movie of all time or favorite screenplay? 
    THE GODFATHER. I love the multiple layers of this film. It’s not just a mafia movie. It’s a story about family, what brings us together and what drives us apart. It also explores the theme of the American Dream turning into the American nightmare. This is a theme that I find myself exploring again and again in my feature and TV scripts. THE GODFATHER is endlessly quotable, and even interjects humor into scenes (“Leave the gun, take the cannoli” is priceless). I would love to write a screenplay that people continue to quote years later.

    With actor/director/writer Tom Gilroy and actor Steve Guttenberg at the 15th Annual Hamptons International Film Festival. WONDER DRUG was selected as an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation script for the Hamptons Screenwriters Lab and chosen for a live staged reading of select scenes at the 15th Annual Hamptons International Film Festival, sponsored by the Sloan Foundation. Reading was directed by Tom Gilroy and starred Steve Guttenberg.

    What can you tell us about your screenplay WONDER DRUG?
    WONDER DRUG is a scientific drama that focuses on the DES (diethylstilbestrol) drug disaster. I was inspired to write the script because I am a DES Daughter. My goal was to educate and enlighten audiences about the DES tragedy while also entertaining them. (No one wants a lecture!) 

    WONDER DRUG was promoted as “Featured Script” on The Black List website in 2018; honored on the 2017 Bitch List; selected as a Semifinalist in the 2017 Academy Nicholl Fellowships in Screenwriting (one of only 151 entries to advance from the Quarterfinal Round, with 7,102 scripts entered); named winner of the Grand Jury Award for Best Feature Screenplay at the 2018 Richmond International Film & Music Festival; chosen as an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation script for the Hamptons Screenwriters Lab; and provided a live staged reading of select scenes at the Hamptons International Film Festival, sponsored by the Sloan Foundation.  I’m hopeful that this screenplay will be produced in the near future. 

    The Black List created a special poster to promote WONDER DRUG as a "Featured Script" on its website in 2018. Poster credit: Benjamin Finkel.

    What has your experience as a woman in the industry been like? 
    I can’t, and won’t, lie. It’s been a serious challenge at times. But here’s the thing: I’ve always been a writer. That will continue whether my work is produced or not. After one of those “dark nights of the soul,” I made a decision: If I didn’t like the way things were in the entertainment industry, then I’d have to “be the change,” even if that meant risking being labeled a troublemaker. 

    I participated in the inaugural Women’s Media Summit held in Provincetown, Massachusetts. Together, we brainstormed ways for all women (not just white ones) to get ahead and support each other in the industry. I’ve also banded with likeminded women and men online: in The Black List’s “Go into The Story” writing group; and the Film Brigade’s Writer Accountability (WRAC) initiative. We share information, cheer each other on, and provide words of support during tough times.     

    Through it all, I keep writing – not just feature screenplays and TV pilots, but essays that have been published in anthologies. I’ve gone out on book tours and connected with audiences in real life and online.  I’ve turned myself into a working writer – maybe not in the paid sense, but in terms of working towards a more inclusive future. My words are part of a larger chorus of women and men who are changing the Hollywood narrative. I couldn’t be in better company.

    Do you have a mentor? 
    I’ve been blessed with several mentors. Matia Karrell was my first one. And at various screenwriting labs, I’ve worked under amazing talents such as: Tom Gilroy (THE COLD LANDS); Joshua Marston (MARIA FULL OF GRACE); P.K. Simonds (“Party of Five”); Joy Lusco Kecken (“The Wire”); and Michael Lucker (“Vampire in Brooklyn”). 

    A truly special mentor is producer Stephen Nemeth, who formed and heads up Rhino Films. He has championed my screenwriting since the 2013 Squaw Valley Screenwriters Conference, but that’s not where we first met. I recently discovered that we had crossed paths decades earlier, at Game 2 of the 1984 NBA Playoffs between the Boston Celtics and the Los Angeles Lakers. I was an eighth grader and beyond excited to find Timothy Hutton and (who I presumed to be) Andy Gibb sitting several seats down from me at the old Boston Garden. Before the game started, I approached them for an autograph. Tim kindly signed my program while his friend shared with a smile that he wasn’t Andy Gibb. Flash forward to 2018. Timothy Hutton’s name came up during a conversation with Stephen. I told my Celtics story and soon learned that I had mistaken Stephen for Andy Gibb all those years ago. I was blown away!  I clearly remember Stephen treating me with respect back then, which he continues to do now. The industry needs more feminist gentlemen like him.


    Were you told or did you learn a piece of wisdom or advice you now tell others in the beginning of their career?
    I like to share the advice that I received from Beth Colt, a former Hollywood manager/producer who now owns the Woods Hole Inn with her husband P.K. Simonds. Beth said, “Just keep doing it. Write another spec, submit again. Rinse, repeat. Each one gets better, the cumulative matters. Don’t give up! All the struggle will pay off in the end. Good writing is fueled by life experience.”  

    Where would you like to go in your work?  

    I’d love to be a produced feature film and TV writer. And someday, I want to start a production company and develop not just my own work, but other voices. Inclusiveness is important to me. As Ava DuVernay has said, “If your dream only includes you, it’s too small.”

    Why are you a member of WIFVNE?
    I can’t imagine being a screenwriter in New England and not belonging to it. WIFVNE truly lives up to its mission of supporting the accomplishments of women in film, video, and new media industries. Whenever I get an email from WIFVNE, I pause to read it, as if a friend is sharing cool news or a fun invitation with me. It’s very easy to feel isolated as a woman in the entertainment industry, especially when you don’t live in Los Angeles or New York City. WIFVNE makes me feel less alone.

    Photo credits
    1.  Photo by Anthony Rugnetta
    2. Caitlin with actor/director/writer Tom Gilroy and actor Steve Guttenberg at the 15th Annual Hamptons International Film Festival. WONDER DRUG was selected as an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation script for the Hamptons Screenwriters Lab and chosen for a live staged reading of select scenes at the 15th Annual Hamptons International Film Festival, sponsored by the Sloan Foundation. Reading was directed by Tom Gilroy and starred Steve Guttenberg.
    3.  The Black List created a special poster to promote WONDER DRUG as a “Featured Script” on its website in 2018. Poster credit: Benjamin Finkel.
    4.  Timothy Hutton autograph from the 1984 NBA World Championship Playoffs.

     


  


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