Log in

News

 
  • 25 Apr 2019 8:00 AM | Anonymous

    Register now!  https://edu.huntsphoto.com/hunts-pro-video-road-show-sale-demo/

    April 25, Holyoke, MA  12pm-8pm

    April 26, Providence, RI 10am-6pm

    April 27, Hanover, MA  9am-4pm

    May 3, Boston 11am-7pm

    May 25, Cambridge, MA  10am-6pm

    June 8, Manchester, NH 10am-6pm

    Join Hunt’s at their many Hunt’s Photo locations for their Pro Video Road Show Sale & Demo!

    This event is Free and is a must attend for wedding/event cinematographers, professional videographers, film students, production companies, filmmakers or anyone looking to get their hands on the latest video/audio/tech gear.See and demo Professional and Broadcast audio and video products from Panasonic, JVC, Blackmagic Design, SlingStudio, Sigma Cine Lenses, Tascam, Canon, Sony, Rode, Sennheiser, and more.

    One day specials on many products, student discounts and interest free financing and business leasing is available for up to 36 months

    Get your hands on the phenomenal Full Frame Canon C700 Cine Camera as well as the NetFlix approved 5.7K Panasonic AU-EVA1 camera. See the new Nikon Z6 Filmmakers kit in action and the new Sony RX0MKII camera that’s perfect for Vloggers.

    Check out the great Professional LED lighting solutions from Westcott, Aputure, Fiilex and some budget solutions from Savage.

    Learn about Live Streaming your video to Facebook and YouTube using the Webcaster X2 from Epiphan or the SlingStudio!

    FREE Audio for Video seminars throughout the day.

  • 31 Mar 2019 8:00 AM | Anonymous

    Alin_WIFVNEMARCH2019

    Alin Halajian of Massachusetts – Actress/Producer/Stage Manager/Wedding Planner – Member of WIFVNE

     

    What’s the best part about your work?

    What I love about my work is that my career and a passion come together. In the business world, I specialize in wedding & honeymoon planning, as well as invitation and product design. I love bringing my brides visions to life and enjoy the entire planning process! In show business, I am an actress, producer, and stage manager. I have been involved in over 20 Hollywood films as an extra/background actor where I gained experience in movie making, behind the scenes, and set etiquette. I used my time on set to learn everything I can to work on my craft and grow in the industry through the years. Since then I have pursued my acting career by ongoing classes & workshops, performing in dinner theater shows, comedic theater, student films and short films leading to landing some great roles in films that made it to film festivals and theaters! I love scene playing, storytelling and bringing my character to life. On the producing side of things, what I love most is that it plays a similar role to wedding planning as both require research, preparing contracts, arranging meetings, setting up vendors/entertainers (photographers/video/music, decor, etc.) Playing the role of a liaison to connect, communicate and coordinate with bride/production crew, all parties involved to work effectively with each other. A stage manager also shares similar responsibilities of coordinating a wedding/event as it does in film/theater by making sure everything listed above is confirmed while coordinating communications and overseeing the entire event/theater/process.

     

     

    What challenges have you’ve faced in this industry as a woman?

    I feel my biggest challenge as a woman is finding a strategy to achieve a better work-life balance.

     

    In the age of #MeToo & #TimesUp, what do you hope to see happening in the future for women in our industry?

    I hope to see equal opportunity & respect in all ends of the industry. I feel it’s so important for women to stand by each other, support one another and always be brave enough to speak up, set boundaries and stand our ground!

     

    What’s one way you would suggest people “Change the Lens”?

    I believe in women empowering one another to create, collaborate, write, direct, and produce films and bring their visions to life! This will continue to grow women in film and can help change the lens!

     

    What advice would you give to a new female filmmaker?

    The advice I would give is to connect with other filmmakers and with like-minded people who enjoy some of the same interests and share the same goals! Join organizations and attend events to build connections, network and create films together!

     

    What goals do you have for this year?

    My goal is to take my career to the next level in acting, producing and stage managing by cultivating my work skills, expertise and passion from one industry to another to create, collaborate and work with incredible people on some really cool projects and films!

     

    What women in the region (New England) inspire you?

    Our entire community of WIFVNE inspire me! I love being involved in this organization dedicated to empower women working in the industry to achieve our professional potential, promoting equal opportunities and encouraging each other to lead such creative projects .

     

    Upcoming Events or Announcements? What are you working on?

    I am currently working on a few fun projects, events, trade-shows, and marketing campaigns in business, film and entertainment. I look forward to share and collaborate throughout my adventures!

    It’s been an amazing journey in film and the production side of the industry! I took on a role as the assistant producer and stage manager for the theatrical play “Butter,” a comedy about food written & directed by Kimberly Rose. I also had the opportunity to take on the role as a wardrobe & set designer for the short film “Late Fall,” written and produced by Abigail Jean Lucas.

    As for announcements, I would like to share the success of one of the films that I had the opportunity to work in “Sweeney Killing Sweeney” that made it to film festivals, com-icon, locals theaters and show case cinemas here in Massachusetts and then off to Hollywood, Los Angeles! I landed a fun role in this film playing a comedic waitress, as well as worked as a production assistant on the production end and assisted as stage manager the night of the premiere. So grateful to be a part of this film! Truly an amazing director, cast and crew! Sweeney Killing Sweeney will be available on iTunes starting April 1st, on its way to video on demand and will have another screening at the Regent Theater in Arlington on April 6th. Tickets are still available so come join us and have some laughs!

     

    How can your fans find you!?

    Travel & Wedding Planning www.destinationvows.com/alin-halajian

    www.agirlsgottago.com

    Invitation & Product Design www.zazzle.com/agirlsgottazazzle

    Instagram: Live_to_travel

    Facebook: Alin Halajian/A Girls Gotta Go

    Email:alin@agirlsgottago.com

    Talent Representation http://www.modelclubinc.com/actors/women/alin-halajian

     

  • 31 Mar 2019 7:30 AM | Anonymous

    Stacy Buchanan of Massachusetts – Senior Producer @ WGBH // Co-founder & Producer @ Wicked Bird Media

     

    What’s the best part about your work?

    My co-workers, work environment, and the creative freedom I have on projects.

     

    What challenges have you’ve faced in this industry as a woman?

    Being taken seriously/seen as an equal/professional/peer, dismissal of ideas/workflows. I’m not saying it’s often, but it does happen.

     

    In the age of #MeToo & #TimesUp, what do you hope to see happening in the future for women in our industry?

    That we are seen as equals, given the same opportunities, and capable of the same responsibilities and pay, like our male counterparts.

     

    What’s one way you would suggest people “Change the Lens”?

    Push for more female leads/female-driven stories IN film. When we see ourselves on screen, the representation turns into an effortless opportunity to inspire more women to pursue careers in the industry.

     

    What advice would you give to a new female filmmaker?

    You can be an advocate, but don’t forget to challenge yourself, and focus on being the best industry professional you can be. AND MAKE THINGS HAPPEN. CREATE. WORK. Don’t just talk, DO IT.

     

    What goals do you have for this year?

    My first documentary, THE MAN IN THE MASK (about an actor on a mission to resurrect his former career at all costs), has a sales agent and has been submitted to 2019 film festivals — and fingers crossed for a healthy run/sale! Will also be pitching a couple of documentary projects to cable networks! I’ve got two documentaries that I’m prepping for the adventure (see below in “what are you working on?”)

     

    What women in the region (New England) inspire you?

    All of my female colleagues that are creating. Conversation is great, but action is greater. And when we band together to complete a project, no matter what the challenges are, we prove to that we are capable of anything and have more power than we realize.

     

    Upcoming Events or Announcements? What are you working on?

    Currently producing a couple of music series’ at WGBH (Front Row Boston, Front Row Boston: In Studio, and Front Row Boston: Live at Fraser), and am in post-production on my 2nd full feature documentary THE PRIEST KILLER (about a clergy sexual abuse survivor who makes horror films as a form of therapy/advocacy), and in the late spring/early summer am going into production on my 3rd documentary SUPER CONNECTED: THE STORY OF FORT APACHE STUDIOS (a music documentary about Fort Apache studios in Boston.)

     

    How can your fans find you!?

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/stacyjjbuchanan

    Twitter: @stacyjjbuchanan

    Wicked Bird Media: www.wickedbirdmedia.com

  • 30 Mar 2019 8:00 AM | Anonymous


    Jessica Jones of Maine – Production Supervisor

     

    What’s the best part about your work?

    The stories I get to share with the community.

     

    What challenges have you’ve faced in this industry as a woman?

    I’ve noticed that asserting my opinion or constructive criticism is sometimes met with resistance or doubt when other male colleagues are addressed differently. Also, it’s tough to advocate for myself and what I know I deserve in terms of payment and responsibility, and not underselling my value or apologizing for it.

     

    In the age of #MeToo & #TimesUp, what do you hope to see happening in the future for women in our industry?

    I already see change happening, with the women of Congress dressing alike in solidarity, or repeating what another woman has said and giving her credit before a man can take it (Obama’s staff). I just recently saw a commercial that a former college classmate of mine posted that she was featured in, about changing the conversation in the film industry in how women get paid. One female freelancer in the art department put out a request for other non-union female freelancers to refuse jobs that underbid them to then influence a higher rate of pay for women in the same position as men. And it worked! Those women started getting offered the same rate as men in their field because they stood together. This is what I’d like to see more of in the future, and the future is now.

     

    What’s one way you would suggest people “Change the Lens”?

    This one is tough because while I think it may be necessary right now to change society’s view of women in film, I hope that it balances out later so that what your gender is, is not a factor for going to see a movie or working on a film set. I think that if the media stops reporting things like, “Women are actually funny!” or “Critics are shocked that women and minorities are big-ticket buyers!” that will start to change the rest of society’s perception of women and their capabilities.

     

    What advice would you give to a new female filmmaker?

    Don’t let colleagues get away with behavior or comments that devalues people’s, especially women’s work and contribution to the craft. Call them out!

     

    What goals do you have for this year?

    My goal is to continue to do the best work that I can do and stop worrying if it’s good enough for others (except maybe for my clients!).

     

    What women in the region (New England) inspire you?

    I look to the ones I’m closest to, not only my co-worker, and groups like Maine Female Filmmakers, the Broad Exchange and 100+ Women Who Care, but women in my family and in my friend’s group who are not in the industry. Seeing how their jobs and daily lives affect how they navigate the gender biases all around is inspiring.

     

    Upcoming Events or Announcements? What are you working on?

    I work at a nonprofit that highlights humanitarian nonprofits around the state of Maine. We’re expanding into more cities this year, which is exciting.

     

    How can your fans find you!?

    www.facebook.com/jjonester

    https://youtu.be/gPOoJuWkjLM

    www.stormwarriors.org

  • 29 Mar 2019 8:00 AM | Anonymous

    Ann Marie Charland of Massachusetts – Senior Producer / Head of Production, Ecast Productions – Member of WIFVNE

    What’s the best part about your work?

    The incredible people I get to meet and interview. The places I get to travel to do my job.

     

    What challenges have you’ve faced in this industry as a woman?

    The biggest challenge I’ve faced is male colleagues who won’t take direction from a woman.

     

    In the age of #MeToo & #TimesUp, what do you hope to see happening in the future for women in our industry?

    I hope to see less bias against woman and fewer double standards.

     

    What’s one way you would suggest people “Change the Lens”?

    Mentoring and hiring other women and educating male colleagues about the challenges women face in the industry will be one of the best ways to “Change the Lens”.

     

    What advice would you give to a new female filmmaker?

    Be the best at what you do. Be tough, but kind. Be a team player.

     

    What goals do you have for this year?

    To continue to make high-quality corporate videos for Fortune 500 companies.

     

    What women in the region (New England) inspire you?

    The woman who were my friends and mentors in this business 25 years ago when I started and are still going strong (or have made it to retirement.)

     

    How can your fans find you!?

    EcastPro on facebook, twitter, Instagram. EcastPro.com

  • 28 Mar 2019 8:00 AM | Anonymous


    Alicia Ghio of Connecticut – Producer/Writer/Small Business Owner

     

    What’s the best part about your work?

    I like to tell stories. When a video evokes emotion from an audience or helps a business succeed, I know I’ve done my job. That makes me proud. And, I have to add, that production is chaos, even when you try to plan effectively. So, to see the team you’ve assembled gel and despite the chaos have it result in a production you’re all proud of is fantastic. There’s no greater feeling.

     

    What challenges have you’ve faced in this industry as a woman?

    I think as a woman in this industry you have to work harder to be seen, heard, and recognized. I’ve been in meetings where someone will direct a conversation to my business partner, who happens to be a man, and not to me, even though he and I are equal partners. You can’t let yourself be deterred by an uphill struggle.

     

    In the age of #MeToo & #TimesUp, what do you hope to see happening in the future for women in our industry?

    I hope to see more women supporting and fostering success in one another. I’d like us to break through and be a presence at higher-level positions throughout the industry. We need to set the tone.

     

    What’s one way you would suggest people “Change the Lens”?

    Support women in the industry with your dollars and voice. Go see the movies, talk about the movies, hire women in your own projects (inclusion riders or not), and help teach/mentor women who are interested in joining the field.

     

    What advice would you give to a new female filmmaker?

    I don’t have the thickest skin so I know it’s not easy to let things “roll off your back.” My advice is to just get in there, stick with it, and speak up. Make connections, work with experienced people, learn from them.

     

    What goals do you have for this year?

    I’d like to continue to grow my business, increasing the quality not necessarily the quantity of the projects that come through our door. I’m also the chairwoman of my downtown revitalization organization and one big goal is to get a short film contest off the ground this year that will help celebrate our downtown.

     

    What women in the region (New England) inspire you?

    I have to give a shout-out to Trish Clark, producer and CEO of Nutmeg Institute. I admire her no-nonsense yet collaborative producer style. I love when we join forces on a project. Her passion for the industry and making things happen especially here in CT is inspiring.

     

    Upcoming Events or Announcements? What are you working on?

    Be on the lookout for the launch of that short film contest I talked about above, CityCenter Shorts, later this Spring.

     

    How can your fans find you!?

    My company: http://www.rmedia.tv and @rmediatv on FB, Insta, Twitter too! Me: http://www.linkedin.com/in/aliciaghio And, if you’re into food, in my “spare time” I blog about it: http://localfoodrocks.com

  • 27 Mar 2019 8:00 AM | Anonymous


    Kendra Smith of Maine – Content Creator

     

    What’s the best part about your work?

    Creative freedom, helping grow small businesses through strategic storytelling.

    What challenges have you’ve faced in this industry as a woman?

    Sometimes people don’t take me serious or think I’m incapable when I’m already 5 steps ahead.

    In the age of #MeToo & #TimesUp, what do you hope to see happening in the future for women in our industry?

    All women establishing their own business to create their own rules & get paid what they are worth.

    What advice would you give to a new female filmmaker?

    Stay focused, you WILL fail and don’t let that discourage you. Be hopeful even when the odds are against you, the Universe will work in your favor if you let it!

    What goals do you have for this year?

    Establish my own LLC, tweak and ramp up my brand, prove that I can grow businesses using film.

    What women in the region (New England) inspire you?

    Juliette Sutherland! She’s the first women film maker I’ve met & she’s humble, funny & super talented!

    Upcoming Events or Announcements? What are you working on?

    Working on hosting monthly EDM shows at Thompson’s Point with my partners at Pub House Productions to take Portland’s nightlife to the next level. I will be covering events with my team at MAINERMEDIA.

    How can your fans find you!? 

    Instagram @kennykoolpants website: kendracreates.com

  • 26 Mar 2019 8:00 AM | Anonymous

    Michele Meek of Rhode Island – Founder, NewEnglandFilm.com and Writer/Filmmaker/Professor

    Michele Meek, Ph.D. is a writer, filmmaker, and an Assistant Professor in Communication Studies at Bridgewater State University. Her most recent book Independent Female Filmmakers: A Chronicle Through Interviews, Profiles, and Manifestos is available for purchase via Amazon and Routledge. She also recently presented her TEDx talk “Why We’re Confused About Consent—Rewriting Our Stories of Seduction.”

     

     

    What’s the best part about your work?

    I love taking on challenges. Probably the biggest challenge this past year was giving my TEDx talk “Why We’re Confused About Consent—Rewriting Our Stories of Seduction”—it was one of the most invigorating and terrifying things I’ve ever done. I’m a person who likes to manage several projects at the same time, and I feel fortunate that I’ve been able to do that. Sometimes I do feel a bit like I haven’t decided what I’ll be when I grow up, but that’s ok—maybe I haven’t! I love to teach and to write, and so I spend much of my time doing those two things. But I also am entrepreneurial, and I love being able to support creative people and to implement my own creative ideas.

     

    What challenges have you’ve faced in this industry as a woman? (Or otherwise)

    It’s impossible to quantify the discrimination that I’ve encountered in my life or career. I had the benefit of strong female role models in my life—my mother, grandmother and aunts—so the challenges I’ve faced have much more to do with how as a society we limit what we imagine women can do. We are often not conditioned to cultivate the swagger and confidence that leads to commercial success.

     

    In the age of #MeToo & #TimesUp, what do you hope to see happening in the future for women in our industry?

    There’s no doubt that #MeToo has been transformative, and it’s incredibly satisfying to see the widespread discrimination that has been part of so many industries finally being brought out in the open. Of course, we still have more work to do. What I hope is that women can coalesce and insist together on equality in the film industry—in all of its facets. Without a major movement, I do not think it will change very fast. The Wrap reported that Hollywood will be releasing five times more films with female directors this year, which is incredible. But that still means only 18 percent of films from six major Hollywood studios will be female-directed. So we need to be glad for the gains we are making, but not accept less than full equality until we get there.

     

    What’s one way you would suggest people “Change the Lens”?

    I think all of us can play a role in re-examining our own film history, which has not been kind to women—to say the least. When you see a list like American Film Institute’s “100 Greatest Films of All Time” and there’s not one female-directed film on the list, it hits you—women have actually been making films since the invention of film, but their legacy is in danger of being forgotten. Looking forward is not enough. We also have to change how we look back. Making sure we remember the groundbreaking and amazing work women filmmakers have made throughout the years is as important as making sure women today can produce and fund work. It’s one of the reasons that I worked on the book I did.

     

    What advice would you give to a new female filmmaker?

    There’s no magic potion for “success” and making it as a filmmaker is not easy—no matter what your gender, race, etc. But you must always do what you are passionate about. If you truly love filmmaking or writing, you should pursue it—not because it will make you rich or famous (it likely won’t) but because to pursue it is the only way for you to be happy. Once you’re “all in,” then I suggest you seek out mentorship wherever possible—we all need that support and advice to forge ahead. One way to do that might be to form your own mastermind group. I’m currently part of a “Mastermind Failure Club” in Providence, RI, and it has been absolutely life-changing. It combines the concepts of a mastermind group—incorporating peer creative and business support, accountability, and brainstorming—and a failure club—a challenge to pursue what you want to do despite the high likelihood of failure. If anyone is interested in learning more, email me, and I’ll send you the how-to worksheet on how to start one (it’s free).

     

    What goals do you have for this year?

    I’m working on another book—actually, about failure! I’m also overseeing some exciting changes at NewEnglandFilm.com. We’re going to be launching an award for a marginalized New England filmmaker this year, which I’m excited about, and I’m considering doing some online webinars that will help filmmakers and actors with topics we get the most questions about—funding, grants, casting, etc. I’ll also be working on the Online New England Film Festival, which is currently taking submissions at https://filmfreeway.com/newenglandfilm

     

    What women in the region (New England) inspire you?

    Work that Alecia Jean Orsini Lebeda has done with Women in Film/Video New England. I’m most often inspired by those who are working to be change-makers. It’s hard to think regionally in this way—but I’m grateful for the work of Melissa Silverstein, Stacy Smith, Martha Lauzen, Geena Davis, and Maria Giese who have been instrumental in raising awareness about women in film.

     

    Upcoming Events or Announcements? What are you working on?

    I just released my book “Independent Female Filmmakers: A Chronicle Through Interviews, Profiles, and Manifestos,” and I’ve been doing a series of events and interviews to promote that. Next week, I will be in Seattle for an event with Women in Film there as well as presenting at the Society of Cinema and Media Studies Conference. I also just published an op-editorial on Salon “It’s not just the Oscars: the Library of Congress fails women filmmakers too” at https://www.salon.com/2019/03/05/its-not-just-the-oscars-the-library-of-congress-fails-women-filmmakers-too/

     

    How can your fans find you!?

    www.michelemeek.com www.newenglandfilm.com

    My social media: https://www.instagram.com/michele_meek/

    https://www.facebook.com/michelemeekofficial

    Tweets by michelemeek

    #herstory

  • 26 Mar 2019 8:00 AM | Anonymous

    Hayley Morris of Rhode Island – Animation Director (Shape & Shadow)

     

    What’s the best part about your work?

    I get to be creative every day. I like that every project has its own set of challenges and each one is a little puzzle. I like to constantly be inventive and come up with new ways of making for each project.

     

    What challenges have you’ve faced in this industry as a woman? (Or otherwise)

    I’d say overall there have been instances where I haven’t been taken seriously or felt underestimated. Animation has been a male-dominated industry, so when I started out there were times I wasn’t treated very well. In recent years I’ve been feeling like that has been changing with missions like Free the Bid. I also teach animation and the majority of my classes are women artists. I’m happy to help this new generation of women find their voice.

     

    In the age of #MeToo & #TimesUp, what do you hope to see happening in the future for women in our industry?

    That women aren’t afraid to have their voices heard and that women are given the same opportunities. I hope that women keep telling their stories and we continue to see stories and perspectives from women, POC, LGBTQI etc.

     

    What’s one way you would suggest people “Change the Lens”?

    Definitely going to see more women directed movies.

     

    What advice would you give to a new female filmmaker?

    To keep making, discovering and learning and to surround yourself with people that inspire you. Sometimes you’ll have dry spells with work or creative blocks, but if you continue to push yourself your passion will always show.

     

    What goals do you have for this year?

    Dedicate time to start a new short film.

     

    What women in the region (New England) inspire you?

    Ru Kuwahata is an incredible stop motion animation artist as well. Her dedication and sense of storytelling are very inspiring to me.

     

    Upcoming Events or Announcements? What are you working on?

    I’m in a group show at the Boston Center for the Arts called “The Skin Has Eyes: Animated Visions. I’m showing some of my music videos work alongside artwork from the films. I also have some commercial projects in the works at the moment.

     

    How can your fans find you!?

    shapeandshadow.com , Instragram: shape_and_shadow

     

  • 26 Mar 2019 7:30 AM | Anonymous

    Nikki Bramley of Massachusetts – Director of Photography Member of WIFVNE

     

    What’s the best part about your work?

    Vérité camera work is all about intimate moments. When a subject trusts me and my work communicates their experience- that is the best part of my job.

     

    What challenges have you’ve faced in this industry as a woman?

    A glib answer is- height! I’ve shot far too many on the shoulder interviews standing on my tiptoes or on one foot just to get the correct angle when filming a tall person. Seriously- because of comments from a non-supportive producer early on, I have felt I need to work harder, and have a better attitude than any man on set in order to keep my place on the crew. My hope is that women coming up in the industry now never feel that they have to compensate for their gender. In Boston we are lucky to have incredible people working in our field, and I’ve been fortunate to work with smart, talented teams & learn from many mentors and colleagues.

     

    In the age of #MeToo & #TimesUp, what do you hope to see happening in the future for women in our industry?

    My hope is that our industry becomes more diverse- not just in who we see on screen, but in our crews doing production work behind the lens.

     

    What’s one way you would suggest people “Change the Lens”?

    I know it sounds small, but I’d love to see more opportunities for women within the industry to share experiences and mentor one another. The informal dialogs that popped up on mostly-women documentary crews have been rich, unique, and thought-provoking.

     

    What advice would you give to a new female filmmaker?

    Don’t lose faith in yourself, and don’t be afraid to ask for help- filmmaking is a team sport.

     

    What goals do you have for this year?

    I’m looking for a new verite project to collaborate on, to get my online portfolio up to date and to learn, learn, learn- my biggest goal is to keep progressing in my camerawork so that I have new tools in my toolbox by the end of 2019- new ideas to shape light and texture for interviews, new ways to think about shooting a vérité scene, compositions that are more refined and creative. One of the best parts about our industry is that it requires constant professional growth.

     

    What women in the region (New England) inspire you?

    Allie Humenuk, Jill Tufts & Mary Jane Doherty- these women make beautiful films and images.

     

    Upcoming Events or Announcements? What are you working on?

    Councilwoman is playing in festivals, including the Big Sky Film Fest. The film (directed by Margo Guernsey) follows Carmen Castillo- an incredible community advocate who works as a hotel room attendant and ran for city council in Providence, RI. I’m currently co-producing a documentary with Margo Guernsey about the first (Episcopal) women priests in the U.S.- that film is in pre-production.

     

    How can your fans find you!?

    www.nikkibramley.com, https://www.instagram.com/nikki_bramley/, https://www.councilwomanfilm.com

     

     


  


Log in

Women In Film & Video, New England
P.O. Box 118
East Boston, MA 02128
info@womeninfilmvideo.org

© 2020 Women in Film & Video New England. All Rights Reserved.

 

Manage your Membership Easier



Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software